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Old June 8th, 2012, 19:29
Oonagh Oonagh is offline
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Join Date: May 2012
Location: Barrow Upon Humber, a village in North Lincolnshire.
Posts: 52
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Hi Cal,

thank you for that, my mum is going through exactly that situation now, bless her. She keeps putting it down to old age ( like Hazel ) but I keep telling her I was just the same when Drew passed away.

I can remember my stepdaughter brought a casserole for us both to eat, several days after Drews passing, and I popped it in the oven to heat up. When we were ready for it I opened the oven door and found that I hadn't turned the oven on, so it was fish and chips instead that night The worst thing I found was when the guy came who was taking the funeral, and so wanted to know things about Drew. I couldn't remember much at all! My brain was mush and I knew that there was lots to tell him really, but I just couldn't bring any of it to mind. My stepdaughter was with me fortunately, and she helped a lot, but I really wanted to share some of the funny stories about him, over the years, and couldn't. Just at the time you need to remember, you cant! Of course, now I remember lots of things
It is a horrible time and I identify with all the things you mentioned Cal. I got my words mixed up, stopped in mid sentence because I didn't know what the hell I was talking about, gabbled a lot, and then when it was important to talk to someone, I couldn't string a simple sentence together. I remember I kept apologising to people and saying 'I'm sorry, I'm not with it at all today, just bare with me please.' It's like living in a fog, very unreal and confusing.
Thankfully it does pass with time, but I think it's a very good idea to mention it as it can be quite bewildering and you think you're 'losing it', when it's just a natural thing happening.

Hugs, Gail.
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