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Calypso
August 3rd, 2007, 22:07
Hollywood doesn't do death very well as a general rule. The dying characters almost always look great right up until the end, and are usually spouting world of wisdom or even singing (ala Evita) until the moment they die. I've never seen a Hollywood death where the dying character slipped into a coma for a few hours or days and quietly passed away without a word as most people who die a slow death do.

Can anyone think of an exception?

sandmike123
August 4th, 2007, 12:08
Not off the top of my head I can't. Hollywood doesn't look for realism they look for drama and ratings and what will bring in that all mighty dollar.

Taggart
August 6th, 2007, 08:13
I don't think I can think of an exception.

There seems to be a trend in TV of communicating or seeing the dead, with shows like Cold Case, Six Feet Under and I think Dead Like Me is one of those, too.

Calypso
August 6th, 2007, 19:07
I've noticed that trend, too. I think these shows are popular because so many of us would like just a few more minutes with our loved ones. I know I'd give a lot for one more conversation with Sylvia.

Taggart
August 7th, 2007, 08:11
I think in many of the episodes the communication with the people that have passed has a calming effect on the living.

I can identify with liking the idea of sharing moments or chatting with friends and family that are no longer with us.

echos
August 28th, 2007, 20:14
I thought death protrayed in the Band Of Brothers on the history channel was pretty close to the real thing. They did a great job on that series. :eek:

Taggart
August 30th, 2007, 06:56
I saw Fried Green Tomatoes a couple weeks ago.

I think if the older lady telling the story had actually died when Cathy Bates' character came into the room with the nurse preparing it for the next patient, that would have been realistic because so often we're surprised by someone's death like that, with things left unsaid, unfortunately.

However in the movie, the lady was still alive and someone else had passed away.

ninikins
October 14th, 2007, 15:19
I can't think of any off the top of my head either and I'm an ex-film student!

katharina
December 4th, 2007, 05:36
Hollywood doesn't do death very well as a general rule. The dying characters almost always look great right up until the end, and are usually spouting world of wisdom or even singing (ala Evita) until the moment they die. I've never seen a Hollywood death where the dying character slipped into a coma for a few hours or days and quietly passed away without a word as most people who die a slow death do.

Can anyone think of an exception?

Hmmm... good thought/observation. I can't really think of anything either. Well at least not from a major film.

mollyL
December 14th, 2007, 12:57
Perhaps this film doesn't quite fit the question, but one of my very favorite films is called truly, madly,deeply. It presents what I think is a very realistic view of grief and resolution. It is an British film and one of my very favorite actors, Alan Rickman, portrays the character who is already dead (I won't say anymore about that!) There is a scene of grief that I think is quite realistic, and it may be a bit hard to watch, but I promise after that scene unfolds a beautiful movie!

EMS
December 15th, 2007, 08:12
Am intrigued by Truly, Madly Deeply and am going to see if I can rent from the video store. Would liek to see something realistic about death - unfortunately holywood does not portray the devastation anything like it is. Its neat and clean and tidy, last words said, beautiful faces and really when youthink about it death is not beautiful and clean. Its messy and dirty and ugly and painful.

Its not only holywood that ignores the reality, try finding people in your life everyday who can comfortably discuss death and grief - even those that have suffered it themselves tie it up in a box and put it away. I guess its too hard to carry around at the time and we need to box it up and put it away and only take it out when we have strength to deal with it.

MattHutchings
August 23rd, 2012, 10:47
I think this is a really good point, and I agree completely.

I'm actually working on a short film, trying to show the other side to how families cope with death. I want to focus on the little things that people do in times like this.

I based it a lot off when I lost my dad at the age of eleven to a brain tumor.

Speaking of which I'm actually running a fundraiser at the moment to help make it. Take a look, and if you like it - donate and I'll feature you in the credits!

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/200525

pw5599
December 26th, 2012, 07:41
Also in ads and for example one that hits home with me, the cancer society or hospitals advertising showing wonderful looking (and always bald) cancer patients smiling brightly. It's as if they are advertising cancer and it's treatments as happy wonderful things. Anyone who's walked through a cancer ward knows the real story.

IMU1111
February 28th, 2013, 17:33
I feel as though the way death is portrayed in most movies desensitize people from knowing how death really should be humbly viewed and respected. Unless their path has brought them to experience it directly in their lives to truely understand; many have a hero view if watch action and some war movies or if you watch horror movies mayb a fear death because of how its shown in movies and on television shows them how it is so in thier minds they have a distorted view.